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Posts Tagged ‘Teen Drivers’

Get Safer Teen Drivers by Giving Them Better Cars

U.S. News unveils new car list for teens.

by on Jul.26, 2016

New safety technologies offer parents some peace of mind as their youngsters get behind the wheel.

Parents of soon-to-be-teenage drivers are often faced with a tough decision: what should the newly minted motorist tool around town in?

There two trains of thoAdd an Imageught on this: an older car that when it gets a dings, scratches and dents that often come with learning the rules of the road won’t require a call to the insurance company or a newer vehicle replete with the latest in safety technology, but often comes with a monthly payment and a much higher insurance tab.

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If the latter of the two is your choice, then you’re facing a mountain of choices, all of which will likely be pretty good. However, the folks at U.S. News and World Report have compiled their annual list of Best New Cars for Teens to help parents weed through the options. (more…)

New York Rates Best State for Teen Drivers

South Dakota finishes at the bottom of the list.

by on Jun.10, 2015

Summer see the biggest influx of teen drivers. New York was rated as the best state for teen drivers.

Summer’s here and that means more teenagers will be getting their driver’s licenses that at any point during the year. The impact of teens on the road will be felt less in New York than any other state, according to a new study.

The Empire State has the best combination factors for newly minted teen drivers to be safe and successful behind the wheel, claims South Dakota finished at the bottom of the list.

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Motor-vehicle accidents continue to be the leading cause of death among people between the ages of 16 and 19, the age group with the highest risk of crashes and during the summer an average of 250 teens will die behind the wheel. (more…)

Men More Likely Than Women to Die in Car Crash

Blame alcohol as much as testosterone.

by on May.28, 2015

Men are more likely to die in a crash, and alcohol is just one of several reasons why.

After years of decline, U.S. highway fatalities have taken a jump in recent months, and that could be particularly bad news for men. Whether you blame testosterone or alcohol, male motorists are twice as likely to be killed behind the wheel as women, according to federal crash data.

Men tend to have more severe crashes than women, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports. But in comparable crashes, women are more likely than men to be killed or injured. Separate studies have shown young men are particularly prone to being involved in fatal crashes, and the new NHTSA report indicates that the gap between men and women narrows with age.

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Federal researchers focused on crash data from 2012, a year in which 33,541 Americans were killed on the nation’s roadways. That broke down to 23,808 men and just 9,733 women.

The NHTSA study pointed to a variety of factors that could lie behind this gender gap: (more…)

Teenagers Driving Old Cars: A Deadly Combination

Older vehicles feature fewer safety technologies and lower crashworthiness.

by on Dec.31, 2014

The 2005 Saab 9-3 is one of the safest and least expensive vehicles for teen drivers, according to IIHS.

The fact that teen drivers die at significantly higher rates than other age groups isn’t a surprise to most; however, one of the reasons may be a bit of a revelation: old cars.

It’s often assumed that teenage fatalities involving vehicles – the top reason for teenage fatalities, according to the Centers for Disease Control, is car crashes – can be attributable to a dangerous combination of poor driving habits and a lack of experience behind the wheel.

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However, teenagers also typically drive older vehicles that often lack the safety technologies that could offset some of their inexperience. It’s when that decade-old car or truck gets added to the mix that dangerous can become deadly. (more…)

Parents Finding New Ways to Monitor Teen Drivers

Cameras, Bluetooth combine to keep teens in check.

by on Dec.23, 2013

Teens are easily distracted while driving, but parents have many devices at their disposal to help.

These days its not just Santa wanting to know if kids have been naughty or nice, parents of teenage drivers really want to know as well.

Statistics show that teenage drivers are, well, the worst drivers on the roads. The traffic accident rates for 16- to 19-year old drivers are higher than those for any other age group, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

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Young people ages 15 to 24 represent only 14% of the U.S. population, but they account for 30% or $19 billion of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries among males and 28% ($7 billion) of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries among females, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (more…)

Missouri Offers Most Car Insurance Discounts in U.S.

Good students can earn the biggest savings to offset their high premiums.

by on Oct.21, 2013

Insurance companies offer "good student" discounts more often than any other price break.

Aside from the monthly payment, the “cost” usually associated with vehicle ownership is fuel. However, people often forget about the expense of insuring their vehicle.

Most importantly, it seems like every insurance company touts the discounts they offer, but when looking for discounts it seems it’s where you live rather than what company you use.

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Residents of Missouri, Connecticut, Indiana and Wisconsin enjoy more discounts than any other state. Each of them enjoys the potential to save money more than 32% of the time. (more…)

Teen Driver Can Double Family Car Insurance Premiums

by on Jul.02, 2013

Insurance companies say there's a reason teen drivers boost premiums so sharply.

Adding a teenage driver to the family car insurance policy can double annual premiums, according to a new study – a costly fact of life that reflects the higher risk for younger drivers.

Studies show that drivers under the age of 20 are three times more likely to be involved in a fatal crash, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. And recent data finds the death rate actually increasing after a decade of decline.

Male teens are likely to pay a higher penalty premium than females, but rates also vary depending upon where you live. A teen driver will boost the family car insurance premium by an average of 116% in Arkansas, but just 18% in Hawaii.

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But parents and teens can take steps to reduce the likelihood of tickets and accidents and, in the process, lower insurance costs. These range from taking a defensive driving course to ensuring the young motorist drives a car with such safety features as anti-lock brakes.


Deaths Among Young Teen Drivers Rising Sharply

Distracted driving may be major factor.

by on Feb.26, 2013

Distracted driving may play a major role in rising deaths among young teen drivers.

Countering a more than decade-long trend, the fatality rate among young teen drivers rose sharply during the first six months of 2012, something experts fear may be the result of distracted driving.

The increase echoed a disturbing rise in overall highway fatalities but the Governors Highway Safety Association reported that deaths among 16- and 17-year-old drivers surged a combined 19%, significantly faster than for the general population of motorists.

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“We are still at a much better place than we were 10 or even five years earlier,” said Allan Williams, author of the new GHSA report and the former chief scientist at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. “However, the goal is to strive toward zero deaths, so our aim would be that these deaths should go down every year.”


Fewer Teens Going for a Driver’s License

Makers struggle to appeal to the smartphone generation.

by on Jul.27, 2012

Teens appear to be more interested in texting than driving, according to a new study.

Nearly a third of American 19-year-olds haven’t bothered to get a driver’s license, according to a new study, continuing a downward trend that finds fewer and fewer Millennials plugging into the American car culture.

Instead, suggest researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, (UMTRI), young people are substituting e-mail and text messaging for the traditional forms of socializing that would have required them to get a set of wheels to stay in contact with friends and family.

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“Virtual contact reduces the need for actual contact,” suggested Michael Sivak, co-author of the new UMTRI study.  “We found that the percentage of young drivers was inversely related to the availability of the Internet.”

The report is the latest in a series showing a steady decline in the number of teens getting their licenses. In 1983, only 12.7% of those aged 19 skipped that traditional rite of passage in the U.S.   But the figure had nearly doubled, to 24.5% by 2008.  The latest study looked at U.S. Census and Federal Highway Administration data to determine that in 2010 a full 30.5% of 19-year-olds didn’t yet have a license.


Tougher Teen License Requirements Could Save 100s of Lives

Restrictions could cut deaths in some states by 50%, says insurance group.

by on Jun.01, 2012

Night time is the wrong time for teenage drivers.

Emergency crews struggle to save teens involved in a nighttime accident.

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens, according to government statistics, but a new insurance industry report suggests the numbers could fall sharply by tightening restrictions on teen driver laws.

Among teens, auto crashes are responsible for one in three deaths each year, reports the Centers for Disease Control, but the new study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety projects that at least 500 lives could be saved annually by the use of more restrictive licenses.  In some states, the IIHS said, it expects the fatality rate among teen drivers to fall by as much as 50%.

The new study points out what it calls best-practice policies enacted by various states, including a ban on carrying teen passengers, limited night driving and a requirement for supervised driving.

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“Even the best states can do better,” says Anne McCartt, the senior vice president for research at IIHS. “There’s room for improvement across the board, and states could see immediate reductions in fatal crashes and collision claims as soon as the beefed-up provisions are in force.”