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Automakers Trim Super Bowl Presence – Offer Creative Ads

At $300,000 a second, you better be good.

by on Feb.02, 2009

Hyundai tweaked its German, Japanese rivals with Super Bowl spot for Genesis

Hyundai tweaked its German, Japanese rivals with Super Bowl spot for Genesis

Thirty seconds at a hundred-thou per second for 3 million bucks per commercial is a carefully considered advertising expenditure (some call it an investment) anytime, but especially in to-day’s gloomy economic environment.

Commercials have become almost as important as the game itself to marketers with hype and hyper promotion. Over the past 43 Super Bowl broadcasts though, automotive commercials have been significantly lackluster, never ranking high with consumers. It’s doubtful this years efforts will be any different in on of the most exciting Super Bowl games.
Here’s my twitter style review of the in-game commercials.
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Automakers Rethink Super Bowl

Audi, Hyundai trying out a new breed of Super Bowl spots

by on Jan.29, 2009

Arguably the best professional football game ever was played almost half a century ago in the snow, mud and cold in a wind swept stadium between the New York Giants and the Baltimore Colts in Yankee Stadium.

Audi's A6 - a smaller, different presence on the Super Bowl

Audi's A6 - a smaller, different presence on the Super Bowl

The super stars of that historic game known as the ‘greatest game ever” – Frank Gif-ford, Johnny Unitas and Raymond Berry were paid about ten grand for the season. The season! Television broadcast of the historical game barely extended across the Hudson River or went as far South as the Chesapeake Bay even though it was called a national broadcast.

Seven years later, the Pete Rozelle era had started, Super Bowl I was going to be played between the Packers and the Chiefs in sunny California. The super star players, Bart Starr and Len Dawson, were up to over twenty-something grand a season.

But it was the not so auspicious beginning of manor national television coverage by CBS and NBC networks who were able to pull in adventuresome big bucks advertisers with exclusivity by category contracts. A :60-second spot in Super Bowl 1 sold for $75,000.

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