Nissan Production |
Detroit Bureau on Twitter

Posts Tagged ‘nissan production’

Nissan Wants 10 Percent US Marketshare by End of 2017

Maker looking for additional capacity to meet the goal.

by on Feb.13, 2015

Jose Munoz, the CEO of Nissan North America, said the automaker wants to increase its U.S. marketshare to 10% by 2017.

Nissan is looking at plans to add more production capacity in North America as part of its efforts to raise its marketshare in the U.S. to 10% by the end of 2017.

Jose Munoz, chairman of Nissan North America, told the Economic Club of Chicago, that the Japanese automakers remains committed to its goal of capturing additional marketshare in the U.S.

Sign up for a Free Subscription!

“I’m very confident were going to steady growth in the years, he said. “We are shifting into the quality growth plan in order to maximize the quality of the service we provide our customers through our dealers. I worry about every single one. We also see it as a huge opportunity.” (more…)

Nissan Outlines Big Boost in Production in the Americas

Increased exports critical part of plan.

by on Aug.26, 2013

Nissan recently expanded capacity at its Canton, Miss. plant to handle the latest-generation Altima sedan.

With expanded operations in the U.S., and new plants in both Brazil and Mexico on tap, Nissan is projecting a big jump in production capacity in the Americas.

While the maker is targeting significant sales growth in North, South and Central America, increased exports are a major factor in the maker’s production push – which will see it boost capacity to more than 2 million in the Americas by the end of 2014, it says.

A Productive News Source!

The second-largest Japanese automaker is in the midst of a $5 billion investment program that includes its two assembly plants in the U.S., as well as new operations in Latin America. In all, it expects this “response to strong growth opportunities” to generate, according to a corporate statement, “more than 10,000 jobs across the region, with much of that hiring complete or underway.”


Nissan’s North American Plants Outproducing Toyota, Honda

Maker admits needing more capacity in U.S., Mexico.

by on Jul.20, 2011

The first truck rolls off the line at Nissan's Canton, Mississippi plant in 2003.

Its sales may lag well behind industry giant Toyota, but Nissan North America is now out-producing the transplant operations run by its rival.

In fact, Nissan’s four assembly lines in the U.S. and Mexico turned out more cars, trucks and crossovers than any other transplant network during the first half of 2011 – and will likely need to undergo a major expansion in the near future, company officials tell

Through the end of June, Nissan produced 565,730 vehicles at those four North American plants.  Significantly, that was a 9.1% increase over year-earlier levels despite the interruptions caused by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami that tattered much of the automotive supplier network based in Northeast Japan.

News you can use!

Toyota saw production fall 28% during the first half, to 555,972 vehicles, while third-ranked Honda’s North American production network reported a 20.8% drop, to 516,603 cars, trucks and crossovers.

“They did a lot better job” at Nissan overcoming the parts shortages that were created by the March disaster, says Aaron Bragman, automotive analyst with the consulting firm IHS.


Nissan Planning to Expand North American Capacity

Another U.S. plant a possibility; maker may also add Infiniti production.

by on Jun.29, 2011

With the Juke and a number of other new products coming to the U.S., Nissan needs to expand North American production capacity.

This story has been updated to include details on Nissan’s individual U.S. and Mexican plants and more on its plans for Infiniti.

Anticipating significant growth in both North and South America Nissan is working up plans that will call for the expansion of its current production base in the U.S. and Mexico, a senior official confirms, hinting that the maker may also resume production of Infiniti models in North America.

Nissan earlier this week unveiled a new 6-year plan, dubbed Power 88, that projects a 50% increase in global sales, with much of that expected to come from China, India and other emerging markets, but the U.S. and other parts of the Americas are central to what global marketing chief Simon Sproule acknowledges is an “aggressive” plan.

News you can use!

“What’s clear is if we look at our aspirations for growth in the U.S. and the role the (two Nissan) Mexican plants play for our growth in North and South America we’re going to have to have more capacity,” said Sproule, who was interviewed during a segment hosted on Detroit NPR affiliate WDET-FM.


Nissan Forecasts Record Sales but Declining Profits

Maker likely least hurt by March disaster among major Japanese brands.

by on Jun.23, 2011

Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn, shown with a Nissan Leaf, forecasts an unexpectedly good year..

Like its major Japanese rivals, Toyota and Honda, the March 11 earthquake and tsunami will take a substantial toll on Nissan’s earnings for the current fiscal year, the maker forecast today – but Nissan officials also predicted that their company will experience another year of record sales despite a substantial cut in production in the weeks following that disaster.

Nissan’s strong reliance on overseas assembly plants – and suppliers outside Japan – helped minimize the impact of the disaster, the company has suggested, allowing it to resume production faster than those competitors, especially Toyota, which continues to base a large portion of its production operations in the home Japanese market.

News You Can Use!

Nissan’s net profit is now projected to slip 15.4%, to ¥270 billion, or $3.4 billion, down from ¥319 billion in the previous fiscal year, which ended March 31.  On the other hand, revenues are expected to climb 7.1%, to ¥9.4 trillion.  The maker, meanwhile, said it would double its dividend to ¥20 per share this year.


Japanese Production Bouncing Back – But Automakers, Suppliers Ready to Abandon Quake-Prone Nation

“Frantic” efforts and “war rooms” helping suppliers get back to business.

by on May.12, 2011

The March 11 quake -- and the strong yen -- could lead Toyota and others to increasingly shift more of their production out of Japan.

It won’t be a good year for Japanese automakers large or small.  The disaster that shook the island nation two months ago all but shut the industry down for a month and makers will be operating at a fraction of normal levels for some time due to shortages of parts ranging from plastic panels to microchips.

But a massive, behind-the-scenes effort could end the crisis a bit sooner than expected – though it leaves many observers wondering just how much Japan’s home auto industry will be hollowed out in the process.

Fun to Read!

Even as manufacturing slowly creeps back to normal, industry officials are warning that they may shift more of their operations – both automotive assembly and parts production – out of quake-prone Japan.

“How much longer should we insist on producing in Japan?” asked Chief Financial Officer Satoshi Ozawa, as the maker announced a 77% plunge in its profits on Wednesday.


Honda Up, Ford Down as Parts Shortages Spreads

Japanese maker resuming some production, Ford idling pickup, two European plants.

by on Apr.01, 2011

Ford will idle an F-Series pickup plant next week, as well as a facility in Belgium, due to shortages of Japanese-made parts.

Ford Motor Co. will be forced to idled a pickup truck plant in Louisville, KY next week due to a shortage of Japanese-made parts.

The announcement comes even as some Japanese assembly lines begin to roll again.  Honda plans to resume production in its home market starting April 11, though because of the damage done to the Japanese parts supply network those plants will initially operate at only about half their rated capacity through at least April 15th.

Subscribe for Free!

The earthquake and tsunami of March 11th brought many Japanese suppliers to a grinding halt – though direct damage to assembly plants in Japan was relatively limited.  But the subsequent problem with the Fukushima nuclear plant has complicated matters, forcing Japanese suppliers and automakers alike to curb production due to rolling blackouts that have spread across much of the country.

Automakers have so far loss several hundred thousand units of capacity in Japan alone, according to various analysts, Deutsche Bank estimating that all the Japanese automakers will now lose money during the first half of the fiscal year that began today.

“There’s no doubt financial results will be influenced by the earthquake,” Toyota President Akio Toyoda acknowledged during a meeting with reporters at the company’s headquarters in Toyota City, Japan, on Friday. “Ports, industrial complexes and roads are destroyed.”


Japan Auto Crisis Quickly Going Global

Entire Japanese auto industry likely to lose money, key analyst forecasts.

by on Mar.28, 2011

Honda braces for plant closings in North America, which could play havoc with the upcoming launch of the 2012 Civic.

It’s not going to be a good spring for Japanese automakers, the ongoing industry shutdown likely “push all companies into the red” for at least the first half of the year, warns a key industry analysts.  But the impact, which has already struck General Motors, is rapidly spreading through the rest of the automotive world.

In North America and Europe – as well as Japan – supplies of key Japanese-made parts and components are rapidly dwindling.  That has led several Japanese makers, Toyota and Subaru, to pare back U.S. production, as well as to a week-long shutdown at a General Motors truck plant in Louisiana. Two GM plants in Europe are now being impacted, as well, while Volvo is warning its production plans are also in jeopardy.

Subscribe Now! Free!

“This is the biggest impact ever in the history of the automobile industry,” said Koji Endo, managing director at Advanced Research Japan in Tokyo.

The worst effects, however, are being felt by Japanese makers.  With only a few exceptions, auto assembly operations in the home market remain shut down.  In large part, that’s a direct result of damage from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami which hammered many parts and component plants in the northeast corner of Japan.

As much as 20% of Japanese automotive semi-conductor production may have been lost for months due to the damage to one particular plant, but other silicon-based operations have also suffered at least short-term damage.

Even the production of paint pigments has been impacted, Ford Motor Co. last week forced to temporarily stop taking orders for a number of models in Tuxedo Black and three shades of red.  Chrysler is also taking steps to restrict orders for some colors using Japanese pigments.

“We see the situation as severe but definiable,” said Deutsche Bank analyst Kurt Sanger.  “We assume the impact to production should push all (Japanese car) companies into the red” for the first half of the fiscal year which, for makers like Toyota, Honda and Nissan, begins on April 1.

Collectively, Sanger estimated that Japanese production, initially forecast at 23 million vehicles, will come in about 15% lower.

Barring significant additional setbacks, however, the DB analysis projects the makers will be able to return to profitability during the second half of the fiscal year, beginning on October 1, “and we do not see permanent impairment to corporate value.”

But other analysts have warned that shortages of products and delays in the resumption of production could make Japanese brands more vulnerable to their European and North American competitors.

That’s especially worrisome to Honda, which on Friday issued an advisory to its North American employees that production could soon be interrupted due to parts shortages.  The timing couldn’t be worse considering the upcoming launch of the 2012 Honda Civic.  Long a mainstay in the compact segment, the Civic is now facing tough new competition from rivals like the new Ford Focus, Chevrolet Cruze and Hyundai Elantra.

Honda was the only Japanese automaker to report an earthquake-related death at one of its facilities.  And the Tochigi technical center where that occurred is expected to be out of operation for months, which could delay future product development programs.

Toyota has announced the delay of the Japanese launch of its Prius V, a new model that will share the well-known Prius badge with a current, smaller hybrid.  It is unclear whether Toyota will have to postpone the U.S. roll-out of the Prius V, scheduled for late summer.

Goldman Sachs estimates the shutdown of production has been costing Japanese automakers a collective $200 million a day.  Toyota is suffering a disproportionate share of the impact not only because of its overall size but because it depends more heavily on a Japanese production base than major rivals.

Nissan may, in fact, be able to leverage its North American operations to help restart production back home.  The company is considering the possibility of increasing production of engines at a plant in Decherd, TN, which would be shipped back to Japan to replace output lost when the quake and tsunami damaged a home market engine plant.

Some Japanese Car Plants Ready to Reopen

But problems persist and could threaten GM.

by on Mar.16, 2011

Toyota pares back production of models like Camry at North American plants but resumes some Japanese operations tomorrow.

With the lights on the landmark Tokyo Tower darkened due to power shortages across the country, things are anything but back to normal in Japan, but one sign of progress comes from Toyota, which says it will reopen some of its parts plants on Thursday, though the maker will keep assembly lines shuttered until at least the 22nd.

The plants resuming operation tomorrow will supply much-needed parts to vehicles in use in Japan.  Meanwhile, Toyota said, it will resume production, next Monday, of parts needed by its overseas plants.

That’s good news for managers of assembly operations in North America, where the maker late yesterday announced it would trim overtime and Saturday hours because of the threat of possible parts shortages.  Like many so-called “transplants,” Toyota’s U.S. and Canadian assembly lines remain dependent upon many parts and components shipped in from Japan.

“It didn’t make any sense to build vehicles on overtime if we were not sure we would have enough parts,” explained spokesman Javier Moreno.  How long the slowdown will continue remains uncertain.  “We’re not sure how many parts they can send us,” said Moreno.

News and Reviews You Can Use!

Toyota isn’t the only maker worried about the impact on foreign operations.  Subaru has halted production at its Indiana plant.  And even Detroit makers are worried about parts shortages triggered by problems with Japanese suppliers.

Chris Perry, General Motors vice president of marketing, told reporters in Detroit it is possible GM’s production in the U.S. could be hurt. “It’s going to have an effect on all manufacturers,” said Perry adding the impact could extend to GM’s operations in China.


Japanese Car Production Up for First Time in 3 Years – But Not For Long

But Nissan, others shifting production to the U.S.

by on Feb.01, 2011

Nissan will shift Rogue production to the U.S.

Japanese car production rose 21.3% last year, the first increase in three years – though the trend is almost certainly downward, as makers like Nissan prepare to shift more manufacturing out of the home market.

Passenger car output jumped to 8.3 million in 2010, the first upturn since 2007, while truck production rose 22.8%, to 1.2 million, the first move upward in seven years, according to the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association.

The increases reflected a rise in motor vehicle exports, which jumped 33.8%.  That was the first positive move in two years, JAMA announced.

Your Independent News Source!

The increases all came as good news for a Japanese economy that has struggled through more than a decade of stagnation.  But there are strong indications things won’t last.  On the local front, the Japanese government has wrapped up its green car incentive program, which helped spur strong demand for models like the Toyota Prius – the top-selling automobile in Japan in 2010 – and the Honda Insight.