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Posts Tagged ‘Magneride’

ZF Active Shocks Can Regenerate Power Like Hybrid

System promises “sports car handling” and luxury sedan comfort.

by on Aug.30, 2013

The ZF GenShock can recapture energy while smoothing out the roughest road bumps.

With its deeply rutted roads, Michigan just might turn into the energy capital of the world if ZF has its way.

The German automotive parts maker has developed what it claims to be the “world’s first fully active, regenerative suspension.” While a number of other suppliers have developed active suspension concepts over the years, ZF Friedrichshafen AG has teamed up with Levant Power Corp. to produce a system that actually works like the regenerative braking system in a hybrid vehicle, recapturing energy whenever the suspension gets jostled.

Shocking!

While the concept likely won’t be used to power your car, it does address one of the biggest problems with earlier active suspension concepts, such as one Massachusetts-based Bose demonstrated a few years back. Past designs have required vast amounts of energy to operate, and that meant bigger alternators and heavier batteries – cutting into fuel economy, among other things.

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High-Tech Suspensions Smooth Out The Bumps

New systems improve ride and handling of luxury vehicles.

by on Jun.06, 2013

Mercedes improved the ride and handling on the S-Class for 2014 using a new system called Magic Body Control.

With more and more states and local communities struggling to balance their budgets, road repairs are among the first things to be cut. In places like Detroit, where winter is particularly tough on tarmac, that can translate into potholes that match the worst you’ll find in a third-world country.

But automakers and their suppliers are rolling out some high-tech solutions that can make all but the worst bumps and ruts virtually vanish.

News You Can Use!

Electronically controlled suspensions have been around for several decades, but early systems did little more than firm up a vehicle’s shock absorbers and they usually seemed to either be too firm or too soft.

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