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First Drive: Lincoln MKX

MKX is good, but it doesn't stand out compared to Ford Edge.

by on Sep.02, 2011

Lincoln's MKX crossover was refreshed for 2011.

Ford has gone on record to say that it knows its Lincoln brand needs to step up its game. So what’s wrong? This MKX crossover offers a good chance to examine some of the issues.

The MKX is the Lincoln version of the Ford Edge. Both vehicles were freshened for 2011 with mildly updated styling and small revisions to everything from the engine to the aerodynamic aids. But the biggest change was the addition of MyLincolnTouch, a new graphic user interface that works with Ford’s groundbreaking Sync voice control system.

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The MKX’s relationship to the Ford version is evident immediately. While some Lincolns, such as the MKZ and MKT, get unique shapes compared to their Ford counterparts, the MKX and Edge differ mostly in front and rear-end treatments. Other automakers – such as Toyota which builds its Highlander and Lexus RX350 on same platform, for example – do a better job differentiating their luxury vehicles from the garden-variety ones.

Lincoln has at least established a good start on the styling front. The split-wing grille design is unique, yet it also looks back on Lincoln history.

But beyond the special grille, Lincoln’s styling isn’t expressive or cohesive enough. The MKX literally looks like an Edge with the fancy grille and some extra bright work throughout the rest of the vehicle.


First Drive: 2011 Lincoln MKX

New Lincoln crossover moves further upmarket, adds power and major electronics upgrades.

by on Sep.14, 2010

The 2011 Lincoln MKX undergoes significant changes for the new model-year.

Now that Lincoln has been permanently severed from the Ford-clone Mercury brand, the division will have to claw its way upward a step at a time into the realm of real luxury cars, and for 2011, there are a couple of significant steps, notably including the new MKX crossover.

The 2011 Lincoln MKX, first shown to more than a year ago at a private event during the annual Pebble Beach Concours, has major upgrades that should significantly enhance its appeal.

The restyled MKX has the same doors and roof as the 2010 model, but everything else is new, inside and out.  The grille, hood, fenders, lamps, tailgate, and rear lamps, and a completely new interior, instrument panel, steering wheel and dashboard.

The big crossover now has the same large, toothy, split-wing grille as Lincoln’s sedans and the 7-seat MKT in lieu of the original horizontal mesh grille.  At the rear, the full-width taillamp of the 2010 has been replaced by twin lamps, so, in total, it looks very different from the original MKX.

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All 2011 MKXs will be powered by an upgraded 3.7-liter V-6 engine rated at 305 horsepower and 280 foot-pounds of torque, driving the front tires through a 6-speed automatic transmission.  A computer-controlled all-wheel-drive system will be optional. Ford says the MKX will have best-in-class fuel economy of 19 mpg city and 26 mpg highway.


First Look: 2011 Lincoln MKX

Crossover gets facelift, new touch-sensor tech.

by on Jan.12, 2010

Lincoln gives the 2011 MKX a new look, starting with the revised, split-wing waterfall grille.

In its continuing quest to rebuild the brand, Lincoln rolled out a heavily updated version of its MKX crossover, setting in motion the second day of the North American International Auto Show.

The visual changes to the 2011 Lincoln MKX give the CUV a more familial look, starting with a split-winged version of the maker’s large, waterfall grille – something that has become the primary gene in what designers like to call brand DNA.  One of five new products debuting over a two-year period – “the most aggressive product rollout in the companies history,” noted Ford – there’s now a strong and unmistakable resemblance between the MKX and the larger, more luxurious MKT.

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“In the early days, people knew what Lincoln stood for,” proclaimed Bill Ford, chairman of Lincoln’s parent Ford Motor Co.