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Posts Tagged ‘GM collision avoidance’

GM Launches New Active Safety Test Center

Crash-avoidance tech becoming better, cheaper, more common.

by on Jul.24, 2015

A Chevrolet Malibu with a pedestrian braking system stops short of hitting a "child" during a test.

As the big Chevrolet sedan races down the asphalt the driver seemingly misses the young boy who steps out on to the pavement. But his car doesn’t. An artificial vision system not only spots the pedestrian but slams on the brakes, stopping just a few feet before what might have been a deadly impact.

In fact, the demonstration run out at the General Motors Proving Grounds in Milford, Michigan used a pint-sized dummy rather than risking an actual child, but it provided a clear look at a new technology that the maker plans to begin offering in 2016 on several models, including the new Chevy Malibu.

The Last Word!

Front Pedestrian Braking is, in fact, one of 22 different crash-avoidance technologies GM says it will offer through its four North American brands next year. And It promises more will follow, some already under development at a 52-acre Active Safety Test Area carved out of the suburban Detroit engineering complex.

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GM Develops New Collision Warning System

Relies on low-cost, single-camera design.

by on Sep.30, 2011

The new GM crash-avoidance system relies on a single camera to help reduce the cost for mainstream buyers.

General Motors is planning to equip the 2012 GMC Terrain with the industry’s first, “affordable” crash avoidance system. The system is based on a single camera placed in front of the rear-view mirror to help drivers avoid front-end and un-signaled lane departure crashes.

It’s by no means the first collision avoidance system on the road, but the new technology significantly lowers the price compared to existing designs that may use multiple cameras, radar sensors or both, putting the system within the price range of mainstream, rather than luxury, buyers.

Stay in the Know!

“Digital image sensors are used in just about everything from cameras to mobile phones to computers and this is making them a more-affordable alternative for use in vehicles,” said Raymond Kiefer, General Motors Technical Fellow for crash avoidance systems.  “By combining a digital camera with state-of-the-art image processing algorithms, we’re able to estimate when a crash may be imminent,” he said.

This dual-benefit crash avoidance system will cost $295, which is significantly less expensive than the systems now available in luxury cars, GM’s experts said. The maker developed the system with extensive help from suppliers, including Magna, TRW and Mobileye.

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