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Posts Tagged ‘fuel economy improvement’

Fuel Economy Hasn’t Much Changed Since 1923

Or has it? Federal data leaves some big gaps open.

by on Aug.20, 2015

New study suggests that today's auto fleet isn't getting much better mileage than it did 90 years ago.

Federal guidelines are calling for some big increases in fuel economy over the next decade, with the average vehicle required to deliver 54.5 mpg by 2025.

But a new study by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, or UMTRI, adds a cautionary note to that push, noting that from 1923 to 2013, the average mileage of the American automotive fleet rose a meager 3.6 miles per gallon, to just 17.6 mpg.

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In fact, fuel economy actually tumbled for a number of years, only starting to rebound in 1974, in the wake of the first Mideast oil shock as Washington enacted the first Corporate Average Fuel Economy, or CAFE, standard.

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Gasoline Prices Continue Climbing in US

Auto fuel efficiency continues to rise, survey shows.

by on Jul.08, 2014

The strong sales of the Ram 1500 Diesel has contributed to the national improvement in fuel economy for new vehicles.

With gasoline prices inching upward this summer, the fuel economy of the new vehicles sold in the U.S. is continuing to improve compared with historic figures, the University of Michigan reports.

Despite a slight dip in June, fuel economy of new vehicles sold in the U.S. has exceeded 25 miles per gallon for the fifth straight month, according to researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) responsible for the monthly survey of fuel economy trends.

The Journal of Record!

The average fuel economy – window-sticker values – of cars, light trucks, vans and SUVs purchased last month was 25.5 mpg, down from a record-high 25.6 mpg in May. Vehicle fuel economy is now up 5.4 mpg from October 2007, the first full month of monitoring, noted UMTRI researchers Michael Sivak and Brandon Schoettle. (more…)