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Ford to Invest $400 Million in Kansas City Plant

Automaker hasn't announced what vehicle it will build there.

by on Jan.19, 2011

Ford will invest $400 million in its Kansas City factory to produce an unspecified vehicle, while retaining 3,750 jobs.

The plant currently builds F-150s and Escapes, but Escape production is moving to Louisville.

Speculation about the vehicle that will be built at Kansas City centers on the 2012 C-Max, a seven-passenger microvan that is similar is size to the Mazda 5.

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“This investment and promise of a new vehicle to be built in Kansas City reinforces Ford’s commitment to U.S. manufacturing and American jobs,” said Mark Fields, Ford president of The Americas.

“Investing in our plants, products and people is critical to Ford’s ability to compete with the best in the business. Ford is committed to doing everything it takes to work with its partners, including the United Auto Workers, to remain competitive.”


The Factory that Built the American Dream

Henry Ford’s Highland Park Assembly Plant 100 Years Later.

by on Jan.04, 2010

A machine that changed the world. Henry Ford and the Model T.

On New Year’s Day of 1910, Henry Ford started producing Model T’s at what was then the world’s largest auto factory – the Highland Park Ford Plant. It was an airy complex that would change the world with his new ideas – the moving assembly line, and more than doubling his workers’ pay to the unheard of sum of $5.00 a day.

The assembly line made mass production possible and the unexpected result of boosting his workers’ paychecks meant they could buy his cars and everything else under the sun. Other companies had to compete for the same workers and his employee’s twofold pay increase drove wages up around the country, which stimulated demand.

This true “trickle down” phenomenon gave birth to the modern American Dream of home ownership, plentiful high paying jobs, decent schools and a pathway to citizenship for those willing to do a hard day’s work. There are still lessons to be learned.


“Mass production and the $5.00 day gave the country an enormous boost; it simply made consumers out of almost everyone, in terms of automobiles. The automobile industry was so important to the economy that as it went, the economy seemed to go,” said David Lewis, professor of Business History at the University of Michigan.