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Enter Our “Rename BP” Contest

The winner gets a can of anchovies, packed in oil of course.

by on Jun.01, 2010

The need for a new BP name to escape blame (NNTEB?) is, well, now floating to the surface.

The largest oil spill in U.S. history is creating the obvious need for the rebranding of BP so that when it inevitably uses bankruptcy to escape its still growing multi-billion dollar liabilities, the new, clean corporation can remove itself as much as possible from being associated with the disaster that Bad Petroleum created in the Gulf of Mexico.

I will wager there are expensive consultants working on this right now – numerous bankruptcy lawyers, as well as branding and logo design firms.

However, since we firmly believe in the free, err rigged by the rich, very expensive market, as well as the creativity of our audience, we hope that a name that is much better than Beyond Petroleum (PB or post beyond?) will gush forth from the electronic ether. How about EB for escape blame, or NCC for new clean corp, or DM for drilling mud, or PYNW, as in poisoning your neighbor’s well or DHR for Deepwater Horizon rig?

This is vital so that whatever entity BP becomes (Post-Britannique Moniker, PBM?)  it can drill into a slick new world, uninhibited by having to pay for an ocean’s worth of dead fish, birds and assorted marine non-life (AMNL or maybe just slick oil?).

Posturing politicians (PP?) and our non-regulatory agencies (NRA – oops, need to dodge that naming rights bullet) will also welcome the relief coming from the change of subject (COS?) as the oil spill (OS?) goes on for a longer time than Noah endured the rain. (Ark Oil or just ARC, since BP already holds the rights to Arco?)

So please “spill baby spill” with your ideas. (M-GOL as in millions of gallons of oil liquid?)

Is a “Palin”-drome possible here? After all (or is that after oil?) Sarah used a similar tactic by abandoning Alaska when it became clear that a reckoning was coming and she needed to get out before she was thrown out by voters (GOTO?). How about SBS from “spill baby spill or SBD for “spill baby ditto” – oops, I think that one is taken. Say the ultimate costs imposed by the impotent Obama Administration on BP (hum – IOA?) are $98289 billion, then there are numerous possible new titles for Bad Petroleum if you let your fingers do the walking on your cell phone key pad: WUAUW?

Getting the “unpredictable drift” here? What about RWTM – for relief wells take months?

Send us an “oil-mail” with your worst ideas so we can drill down into the topic. The anchovies await…

EPA and Shanghai Launch AirNow International

Real time air quality information now in China as well as U.S.

by on May.10, 2010

AirNow provides air quality forecasts and real-time data for nearly 400 U.S. cities.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Shanghai Environmental Protection Bureau (EPB) have launched AirNow International, which provides real-time air quality data reporting from the 2010 World Expo in a city with more than 17 million inhabitants.

The Shanghai EPB will use technology developed by EPA to send air quality data to Shanghai citizens through the Internet.

“AirNow has been an extraordinary tool for helping the public understand air pollution in the United States,” said Gina McCarthy, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation. “We’re pleased to be working with Shanghai to use this technology to make real-time air quality data available in China.”

EPA and Shanghai EPB developed AirNow International, building from Shanghai’s existing air quality monitoring system. EPA provided technical assistance to Shanghai.

EPA and China’s air quality collaboration includes advanced air quality modeling to increase understanding of air pollution sources, and to reduce emissions from vehicles, power plants and other industries.

The two countries also are working together to address issues related to climate change, water, toxics, solid and hazardous wastes, and environmental governance.

EPA’s AirNow program has steadily expanded in its 11 years. The program provides air quality forecasts and real-time data reporting for nearly 400 U.S. cities. See http://www.airnow.gov/.

Sixty Two GM Plants Eliminate Landfill Waste

More than 40% of global operations produce "zero landfill."

by on May.06, 2010

Materials recycled this year include 650,000 tons of metal, 16,600 tons of wood, 21,600 tons of cardboard, and 3,600 tons of plastic.

Sixty-two General Motors Company manufacturing plants have achieved “zero landfill” status by recycling or reusing all normal plant wastes, the Detroit based automaker said today. This means 43% of its global manufacturing facilities no longer send any production waste to landfills.

GM’s goal, announced in 2008, is to convert half of its major manufacturing facilities worldwide into landfill free operations by the end of 2010. To date, GM is now close to delivering on that commitment.

“We’ve been working for quite some time at eliminating waste and developing support systems to recycle or reuse wastes we can’t yet eliminate,” said Mike Robinson, GM vice president of Environment, Energy and Safety policy. “These plants have taken this process to its highest level. They are leading General Motors and the worldwide manufacturing industry.”

Landfill-free GM plants include 27 facilities in North America, 21 facilities in Asia-Pacific and Latin America, and 14 facilities in Europe.

On average, more than 97% of waste materials from GM’s zero landfill plants are recycled or reused and about 3% is converted to energy at waste-to-energy facilities replacing fossil fuels. More than 2 million tons of waste materials will be recycled or reused at GM plants worldwide this year. An additional 45,000 tons will be converted to energy at waste-to-energy facilities.

Other GM facilities also attain high levels of recycling. Overall, GM’s global facilities currently recycle more than 90% of the waste produced.

GM claims that zero landfill plants and other facilities will prevent more than 3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide-equivalent emission reductions from entering the atmosphere this year. Other environmental benefits include avoiding potential environmental impacts from landfill waste. Additionally, recycling materials to make new products reduces energy use and manufacturing costs, compared to using raw materials.

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Will We Drive Less because of the BP Oil Spill?

Latest survey claims one in five Americans will.

by on May.06, 2010

What people say and what they actually do are sometimes two different things.

A national survey released today claims that more than one in five Americans plan to drive less because of the ongoing oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Moreover, one in eight Americans plan to stop buying British Petroleum (BP) gas altogether.

Among the survey’s other findings:

  • The combined impact of the oil spill and the recent mine disaster in West Virginia has caused more than two in every five Americans, or 41.7%, to think about the “human and environmental costs” associated with their own energy consumption.
  • About three in 10 Americans, 28%, said the spill has made them dislike BP, but their “opinion might improve if they can do more to clean up the mess and make amends.”
  • One in five, 20.5%, said they now doubt BP’s “Beyond Petroleum” slogan and believe it is not really a green company. However, 37.5% said it had not affected their opinion of the company in any way. And 17.4% said it makes them “respect the company for taking responsibility for the accident and clean-up.”
  • More than a third of Americans, or 35.5%, said the spill “was a terrible accident, but our country’s need for domestic oil makes the possibility of such accidents an acceptable risk.”
  • And 21% said, “It was a terrible accident waiting to happen, and offshore drilling in the Gulf should be halted.”

The survey polled 1,312 consumers across the country on Monday and Tuesday, has a margin of error of plus or minus 3%.

“For years our research has shown America is a see-it-to-believe-it nation. Before we make changes, we need to see things with our own eyes or have a personal connection to something. If Americans start seeing a lot of oil-covered pelicans or dying dolphins, these numbers will likely go even higher,” said Suzanne Shelton, president of Shelton Group, which conducted the study.

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