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Distracted Drivers Running Over 7 Million Red Lights Annually

New study underscores dangers of texting, cellphoning.

by on Jun.11, 2013

A crash caused by a driver running a red light caught by a camera in Worth, IL.

As much as 12% of red light violations – equal to an annual total of 7.3 million stoplight infractions annually – are the result of distracted drivers, according to a new study.

Though the report doesn’t put a human toll on the problem in terms of crashes, injuries or accidents, some automotive safety experts have singled out red light running as the single leading cause of urban traffic accidents.

The research by the National Coalition for Safer Roads, or NCSR, and anti-distracted driving group FocusDriven tallies the results from stoplight camera images gathered at 118 intersections in 19 communities over a three-month timespan.

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If the findings can be extrapolated on a nationwide scale that would suggest that distracted drivers run red lights more than 7.3 million times annually.


Distracted Driving Ticketing Campaigns Underway

Enforcement Campaigns in Hartford and Syracuse Fight DD.

by on Apr.08, 2010

NHTSA has not taken the simple steps to make cell phone use in vehicles by drivers illegal.

Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood today announced that the DOT is starting pilot programs in Hartford, Connecticut and Syracuse, New York to test whether increased law enforcement efforts can get distracted drivers to put down their cell phones and focus on the road.

Research by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration shows that in 2008, nearly 6,000 people were killed and more than a half million people were injured in crashes involving a distracted driver nationwide.

Almost 20% of all crashes that same year involved some type of distraction. Yet, the nation’s safety agency has not taken the simple steps to make cell phone use in automobiles by drivers illegal in all 50 states.

Many states have banned texting while driving – 21 of them so far. While some, including Connecticut and New York, have banned hand-held cell phone use.

The pilot enforcement programs, similar to previous drunk driving and safety belt use programs, are the first federally funded efforts in the country to focus on the effects of increased enforcement and public advertising on reducing distracted driving.

Drivers caught texting or talking on a hand-held cell phone will be pulled over and ticketed. The message is simple, “Phone in One Hand. Ticket in the Other.”

“Law enforcement will be out on the roads in Syracuse, NY, and Hartford, CT, with one simple message, if a driver is caught with a cell phone in one hand, they’ll end up with a ticket in the other,” said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “It’s time for drivers to act responsibly, put their hands on the wheel and focus on the road.”


Kia UVO revealed

It’s not a car, but an entertainment system.

by on Jan.12, 2010

The electronic content keeps going up.

Kia Motors America showed in Detroit its new in-car communications and entertainment system, “UVO powered by Microsoft,” to be available in select Kia vehicles starting this summer.

The system provides, it is claimed, consumer-friendly voice- and touch-activated experiences for simple management of music files and hands-free mobile phone operation.

Co-developed with Microsoft and based on Windows Embedded Auto software, UVO is an easy-to-use, hands-free solution that allows drivers and passengers to answer and place phone calls, receive and respond to SMS text messages, access music from a variety of media sources as well as create customized music menus.



UVO is just one of a growing number of electronic systems offered by automakers as fatalities from distracted driving rise to record levels. The U.S. Department of Transportation estimates that 6,000 people died last year and hundred of thousands more were injured in distracted driving accidents.