Defective Airbags |
Detroit Bureau on Twitter

Posts Tagged ‘defective airbags’

NHTSA Fining Takata $14K a Day

Supplier fails to explain data in 2.4 million documents.

by on Feb.20, 2015

Takata's Hiroshi Shimizu testified before Congress, but the company hasn't been cooperative in a federal probe about its faulty airbags.

Takata’s refusal to fully cooperate in a federal investigation of its exploding airbags responsible for the recall of more than 18 million vehicles will now cost them more than bad publicity – the company’s going to pony up $14,000 a day.

“Safety is a shared responsibility, and Takata’s failure to fully cooperate with our investigation is unacceptable and will not be tolerated,” Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said in a statement.

The Last Word!

The faulty inflators can explode and spew shrapnel into passenger cabin. At least six people have been killed worldwide due to the problem. The inflators are in cars made by 10 auto companies, which have all issued recalls for the affected vehicles. (more…)

Audi Adds 850,000 Vehicles to Growing Airbag Recall List

But problem is not linked to Takata problems.

by on Oct.24, 2014

The Audi Allroad is one of the models listed in the new recall, along with the A4 and S4.

Audi is the latest automaker to warn consumers about potentially defective airbags, though the maker says the defect it has discovered on some of its smaller A4 models is not linked to the problem that this week led to an unprecedented recall warning by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

The German luxury brand is recalling a total of 850,000 vehicles worldwide, including 101,900 sold in the U.S. and another 15,100 purchased in Canada during the 2013 to 2015 model-years. The service action involves the A4, sportier S4 and wagon-based Allroad models.

Award-Winning News!

The Audi airbags were not produced by Takata Corp., the Japanese mega-supplier now linked to the recall of 16 million vehicles worldwide – including 7.8 million covered by a NHTSA advisory sent out this week.


Jeep Recalling Over 900k Older Models

NHTSA cracks down on faulty airbags.

by on Nov.09, 2012

The 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee is one of several models targeted by the latest recall.

Chrysler is recalling over 919,000 Jeep Grand Cherokee and Jeep Liberty SUVs worldwide due to a potential defect that can cause their airbags to unexpectedly inflate while the vehicles are being driven.

A total of 775,000 older versions of the two Jeep models will be impacted in the U.S., along with 49,000 sold in Canada, 22,000 in Mexico and the rest distributed to other global markets.  While the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says the problem has not led to any accidents there have been a number of minor injuries caused by the inadvertent airbag deployments.

Your News Source!

The latest recall adds to the growing tally of safety actions related to airbag safety defects. Ford, Honda and Hyundai are among the list of other makers who have been affected in recent years.


Honda Adds Another 304,000 Vehicles to Ongoing Airbag Recall

Problem has spurred a series of recalls since 2008.

by on Dec.02, 2011

Honda has so far recalled about 2 million vehicles for a defective airbag problem.

Honda is recalling 304,000 vehicles worldwide – most in the U.S. – due to a problem with overactive airbags linked to several deaths and a number of injuries.

The move is the latest to deal with a problem that first forced the maker to act in 2008 and again in each of the following years, now collectively involving the recall of about 2 million vehicles.

The problem initially appeared to be related to the use of the wrong chemical for the airbag igniter.

Upgrade Your Insight!

In an accident serious enough to require a vehicle’s bags to inflate an electrical signal is sent to the igniter which explodes, filling the airbag with hot gases and providing a cushion that normally is meant to reduce the likelihood of death or injuries.  But with the defective airbags they may inflate too aggressively, causing their own injuries.