China Volt |
Detroit Bureau on Twitter

Posts Tagged ‘china volt’

GM Launching Volt in China

Meanwhile, GM production set to resume in Spring Hill.

by on Nov.23, 2011

The Chevrolet Volt was first shown in China at Shanghai's Expo 2010.

General Motors Co. has set up distribution of the American-made Chevrolet Volt in China – the plug-in hybrid set to go on sale at 13 Shanghai GM Chevrolet dealerships in eight Chinese cities, including the Chinese capitol, Beijing, as well as Shanghai itself, Hangzhou, Suzhou, Wuxi, Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Foshan.

The Chevy Volt will be one of the rare U.S. exports to the booming Asian nation – now the world’s largest automotive market.  Most cars sold in China are produced in-country, with the market dominated by joint ventures pairing local and foreign makers such as the alliance between GM and Shanghai-based SAIC.

Your Auto News Source!

The Chinese will see a sticker price of $75,533, or 498,000 RMB, for what GM prefers to call an extended-range electric vehicle. The Volt is designed to deliver more than 40 miles per charge of its lithium-ion battery pack.  It then can continue driving by firing up a small gasoline engine.

GM made the announcement of the distribution of the Volt in China as part of the company’s  participation in Auto Guangzhou 2011. Two of GM’s joint ventures, Shanghai GM and SAIC-GM-Wuling, are displaying more than 30 vehicles from the Buick, Chevrolet, Cadillac and the new Baojun brands.


GM to Share Proprietary EV Tech with Chinese

Move raises numerous concerns.

by on Sep.20, 2011

GM Chairman and CEO Dan Akerson with his SAIC counterpart Hu Maoyuan during today's signing ceremony in Shanghai.

Under pressure from the Beijing government,t General Motors has agreed to provide access to its proprietary electric vehicle technology to its lead Chinese partner.

The move is raising numerous concerns, critics contending that China is, for one thing, using unfair pressure to gain access to technologies that will later be used by its own domestic manufacturers to compete with foreign brands like GM.

But the U.S. automotive giant contends the move will help it maintain a lead in the rapid electrification of the industry – especially since China, now the world’s largest automotive market, is making a rapid push into battery power to curb its dependence on foreign oil and reduce its endemic pollution problems.

News Now! Stay in the Know!

“We can accomplish far more by working together than we can by working separately,” said Tim Lee, president of GM International Operations, during a signing ceremony with the maker’s lead Chinese partner, the government-owned Shanghai Automotive Industrial Corp., or SAIC.