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Posts Tagged ‘CAFE’

Keeping Current CAFE Standards Saves Owners Big Cash

New study shows car owners save thousands.

by on Sep.08, 2016

A new study shows that keeping the current CAFE standards for 2022-2025 will save car owners more than $3,000.

A new report from Consumers Union, the publishers of Consumer Reports, said retaining the current corporate average fuel economy, or CAFE, standards paves the way for buyers of 2025 model cars and trucks to save thousands of dollars during the life of their vehicle even if fuel prices hold steady.

Vehicle owners will average net savings total approximately $3,200 per car and $4,800 per truck, if the current standards for 2022-2025 remain in place, according to the study. If gas prices rise from today’s historically low levels, the savings would rise to $5,700 per car and $8,200 per truck, the study said.

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Shannon Baker-Branstetter, Energy Policy counsel for Consumers Union, which has long been a proponent of CAFE standards, said retaining the standards will help save consumers not only money on operating costs, but also protect consumers against future price shocks. (more…)

Stop “Crying Wolf,” Over 54.5 mpg Standard, Says “Queen of Cleaner Cars”

by on Apr.27, 2015

Margo Oge retired in 2012 after 32 years with the EPA.

With fuel prices down by as much as 30% from their 2014 peak, millions of Americans have been migrating to pickups and SUVs and abandoning compact passenger cars and alternative fuel vehicles. That’s leading some industry executives to questions whether the federal government should re-think the 54.5 mpg Corporate Average Fuel Economy, or CAFE, standard set to take effect in 2025.

Such a move would be a critical mistake, warns Margo Ogo, a former official with the EPA who helped put together the compromise fuel economy rules and who has been dubbed by some “the Queen of Cleaner Cars.” If anything, she says, the tough mandate targeted for a decade from now doesn’t go nearly far enough.

Balanced Debate!

“2025 is the first down-payment to the planet for the need to get away from fossil fuels,” Oge told during a lengthy interview marking the release of her new book, Driving the Future: Combating Climate Change with Cleaner, Smarter Cars. “We, as a society, need to move to zero-emission vehicles by 2050…if we are to meet goals of reducing carbon emissions.”


Toyota “Staying the Course” Towards 54.5 MPG CAFE Target

“Eventually,” says auto chief Carter, $4 gas “will come back.”

by on Jan.14, 2015

Toyota's Bob Carter said Americans need to be prepared for a return to $4 gas in the future.

Enjoy cheap gas while you can, says Bob Carter, the head of U.S. automotive operations for Toyota. Like all good things, it “eventually” will come to an end.

The collapse of gas prices was the talk of the North American International Auto Show during this week’s media previews, and senior industry officials universally said that this unexpected shift has both its benefits and challenges.

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Consumers have more money to spend, but they’re also asking for the sort of big, powerful vehicles that could make it difficult to meet the upcoming, 54.5-mile per gallon Corporate Average Fuel Economy, or CAFE, standards that will take effect in 2025. (more…)

How Automakers Will Get to 54.5 MPG

Battery cars are only part of the answer.

by on Aug.29, 2012

At 47 mpg, the new Ford C-Max will be one of the market's most efficient vehicles. But it still has a long way to go to meet the new 54.5 mpg CAFE standard formalized this week.

When Ford launches its new C-Max hybrid microvan later this year it will deliver a solid 47 mpg in the EPA’s combined city/highway test, making it one of the most fuel-efficient vehicles on the road. Yet that’s still about 15% short of the target the White House has set for the auto industry with the new mileage standards that will be phased in between now and 2025.

Most major automakers signed onto the compromise regulations announced last year and officially released on Tuesday. But most echo John Krafcik, the CEO of Hyundai Motor America, who admits “We don’t yet know how we’ll get there.”

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Electrification will almost certainly play a role, in some form or another.  But don’t expect to see America switch to battery cars, most industry analysts contend.  The technology will likely remain too limited and too expensive over the next dozen years – and the infrastructure just won’t be there, contends Jim Hall, of 2953 Analytics.


White House Locks Down 54.5 MPG Fuel Economy Standard

“Single most important step” to reduce dependence on foreign oil, says President.

by on Aug.28, 2012

The new mileage standards appear to have solid public support -- especially as gas prices resume their upwards surge.

Bouncing back from an unexpected delay, the Obama Administration today formalized a more than 50% increase in federal automotive fuel economy standards.

Even with automakers struggling to meet the 2016 Corporate Average Fuel Economy, or CAFE, target of 35.5 miles per gallon, the industry will now face a 54.5 mpg goal for 2025.  That figure is the result of extensive debate between industry, environmentalists and government regulators.

But there had been questions raised, earlier this month, when the White House unexpectedly delayed the release of the official rules.  The 2025 CAFE proposal, like much of Pres. Barack Obama’s energy policy, had come under fire from a Republican party set to formalize Mitt Romney as its presidential nominee this week.

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“These fuel standards represent the single most important step we’ve ever taken to reduce our dependence on foreign oil,” the President declared in a statement accompany the release of the new mileage regulations.


Is White House Re-Thinking 54.5 MPG Rule?

EPA delays final decision.

by on Aug.21, 2012

Will all cars in 2025 have to use battery technology like the Infiniti Emerg-E concept?

A week after the EPA was expected to formalize its proposed 54.5 mpg mileage rules for 2025 it appears the Obama Administration could be months away from locking things down.

Despite the reluctant buy-in of most manufacturers there appears to still be some heated opposition to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy, or CAFE update – which would require the industry to increase mileage by about 50% over the already strict guidelines now in place for 2016.

“We expect the process to be completed soon,” an administration official says, though exactly when is uncertain.

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Few expect any major changes to the rules – which was hammered out after some bitter debate between the auto industry, auto unions, environmentalists and the Obama White House.  Earlier proposals would have pushed the CAFE numbers well above 60 mpg.  But with a few exceptions, everyone finally appeared to sign on once the compromise 54.5 mpg number was announced.


Consumers Support 54.5 MPG CAFE, Says New Study

Motorists support 54.5 mpg proposal.

by on Jul.16, 2012

The typical 2025 model will have to offer even better mileage than the new Toyota Prius C, if proposed CAFE rules are enacted.

Despite the recent decline in fuel prices, American motorists still want significantly higher fuel economy from the cars and trucks they buy, according to a new study that found nearly nine in ten of those surveyed want the U.S. to reduce oil consumption while three in four support a proposed increase in the federal mileage standard to 54.5 mpg.

The new report by the Consumer Federation of America was not-so-coincidentally released just before the government is set to finalize a major — and still-controversial – increase in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy, or CAFE, standard. The Obama Administration says it plans to nearly double mandated mileage by 2025.

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“The 54.5 mpg by 2025 standard will be one of the most important consumer protection measures to be adopted in decades,” said Mark Cooper, Director of Research for CFA, an association of nearly 300 nonprofit consumer advocacy organizations across the country.


Three in Four Motorists Ready to “Consider” Alt-Fuel Vehicles

New study confirms fuel economy now the most important factor for U.S. car buyers.

by on May.22, 2012

Motorists say they're very open to alternative powertrain technology. Will that bode well for the new Toyota RAV4-EV?

This year’s near-record run-up in fuel prices has clearly had an impact on the choices American motorists are making when it’s time to buy a new vehicle – in fact, three in four U.S. drivers now say they’re ready to consider an alternative-fuel vehicle, according to a new study.

While many motorists still aren’t ready to trade in their roomy SUVs for high-mileage subcompacts — at least if recent sales are considered — there’s little doubt that there are significant changes underway in the American car market, with fuel economy now a much more important factor than vehicle quality or safety, according to research by the non-profit Consumer Reports.

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“These results make it clear that high fuel prices are continuing to impact driver behavior and influencing future purchase considerations,” said Jeff Bartlett, Consumer Reports deputy auto editor. “While quality, safety and value are still important, this may be foreshadowing a market shift by folks seeking relief at the pump.”


Reports Says Obama’s Fuel Economy Increase to Save $69 bil Annually

NRDC notes surge in high-mileage models already on the road.

by on Apr.20, 2012

With its high-mileage EcoBoost engine, a new study says the 2012 Ford Explorer is already savings owners $1000s on gas.

The recently-enacted 54.5 mile per gallon fuel economy standards will save American motorists an estimated $69 billion annually, according to a new report that suggests the Obama Administration’s push for improved fuel economy is already saving many drivers thousands of dollars.

With a big jump in fuel economy scheduled for 2016 and another by 2025, the Natural Resources Defense Council, or NRDC, stressed that the auto industry is already rolling out a substantial number of new, higher-mileage products that are not only saving consumers money but reducing dependence upon foreign oil.

The report, titled, “Relieving Pain at the Pump: Thanks to Stronger Standards, Consumers Have More Fuel-Efficient Choices”, noted that the number of subcompact cars sold in the U.S. market getting at least 30 mpg has tripled since 2009, to 15.

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The number of midsize models rated 25 mpg jumped from just six in 2009 to 10 during the 2012 model-year.  Meanwhile, the count of crossovers getting at least 20 mpg, meanwhile, has doubled, to 32.  And the report stresses that fuel economy is rising rapidly across the automotive market.

“Drivers today have twice the fuel-efficient car options than just three years ago,” said Luke Tonachel, senior vehicles analyst at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “The technology — and fuel savings — are only going to improve thanks to even stronger efficiency standards.”


Typical Car Got 0.5 MPG Better Mileage in 2011

Hyundai led industry, among major makers, at 26.6 mpg, says new study.

by on Jan.13, 2012

Hyundai led the industry, at least among major manufacturers, when it came to fuel economy in 2011.

The fuel economy of the average vehicle sold in the U.S. last year increased by a half mile per gallon over 2010 – in the process savings American motorists a collective 214 million gallons – or $722 million at the pump — according to new research.

The typical vehicle got 22.2 miles per gallon, reported data tracking service, up from 21.7 mpg in 2010.

But there was a wide disparity among manufacturers.  Chrysler, which is heavily dependent on vehicles like the big Ram pickup and Jeep Grand Cherokee SUV, averaged just 19.9 mpg a 0.2 mpg increase year-over-year.  Korean carmaker Hyundai, which sells several crossover/utes but no truck models, averaged 26.6 mpg, a 1.3 mile per gallon gain.

The Final Word!

Hyundai has been heavily promoting the mileage of its vehicles, four different models now rated by the EPA at over 40 mpg, and that “is right up there with design and with improvements in driving dynamics for boosting our sales,” said Hyundai Motor America CEO John Krafcik, referring to the 20% jump in demand the company reported in 2011.