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Posts Tagged ‘auto safety consortium’

20 Automakers Commit to Standard Auto Braking by 2022

Industry-government consortium will now focus on additional safety breakthroughs.

by on Mar.17, 2016

A schematic showing how an AEB system advises a motorist approaching the vehicle ahead too quickly.

Calling it “a win” for consumers,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx confirmed that virtual all new cars, trucks and crossovers sold in the U.S. will be equipped with automatic emergency braking by September 2022.

A total of 20 major automakers, representing about 99% of the vehicles sold in the U.S., participated in a first-of-its-kind industry-government consortium aimed at bringing the technology to market faster than would be possible going through the normal regulatory process. A recent study suggests auto braking can reduce the number of reported collisions it’s designed to prevent by as much as 40%.

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Safety News!

“By proactively making emergency braking systems standard equipment on their vehicles, these 20 automakers will help prevent thousands of crashes and save lives,” said Transportation Secretary Foxx during a Washington, D.C. news conference Thursday. “It’s a win for safety and a win for consumers.”

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Automakers to Make Auto Braking Standard by 2022

Technology shown to reduce crashes by up to 40%.

by on Mar.17, 2016

NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind has promoted a more aggressive use of safety technology.

Automatic Emergency Braking will become standard on virtually all cars sold in the United States by 2022, a group of leading automakers, safety advocates and regulators will announce today, according to several sources.

The development is the result of an unusual consortium formed last autumn that is expected to serve as precedent for other efforts to get advanced safety technology into new vehicles faster than would be possible through the traditional legislative process.

Tech Talk!

Emergency Auto Braking, also known as Automatic Emergency Braking, can detect when a vehicle is at risk of getting into a front-end collision and slow it or even bring it to a full stop. A recent study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, or IIHS, found that it can reduce such collisions by as much as 40%.

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Automotive Recalls Hit New Record in 2015

Surge reflects large-scale issues like Takata airbag problem, crackdown by feds.

by on Jan.22, 2016

NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind wants more "vigilance in looking for defects."

Automotive recalls hit an all-time high of 51.2 million in 2015, the second record year in a row that has happened, driven in part by the massive problems with faulty Takata airbags.

The announcement by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration at this week’s Washington Auto Show comes at a time when automakers and automotive suppliers are being driven to be more proactive in addressing problems, federal regulators showing far less tolerance and levying far larger fines than ever before for safety lapses.

A Safe Bet!

“Part of what has happened is a vigilance in looking for defects,” said Mark Rosekind, the NHTSA Administrator behind the crackdown, adding that, “getting them addressed, has been effective.”

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Feds, 18 Automakers Agree to Form Broad Consortium to Improve Auto Safety

First joint project to focus on cyber-security; concept modeled after successful aerospace effort.

by on Jan.15, 2016

U.S. Transportation Sec. Anthony Foxx, surrounded by industry leaders, at the news conference.

© 2016 TheDetroitBureau.com

In an unprecedented move, 18 global automakers have agreed to form a broad consortium aimed at not only developing advanced safety technology but also bringing it to a broad a range of consumers as quickly as possible.

The concept was modeled after a similar and successful program developed by the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration to work with aerospace manufacturers like Boeing and Airbus.

The Last Word!

The first of what could become a wide range of projects is already underway, TheDetroitBureau.com has learned. The members of the new consortium agreed earlier this month to pool resources in an effort to thwart the threat of hackers. Cyber-security is considered a critical issue as the industry adds more digital technology to vehicles and works towards a collective goal of putting autonomous vehicles on the road.

The new safety consortium is a “strong start,” and a “new approach,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, surrounded by senior executives from all 18 automakers.

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Google Wants to Know More About New Auto Industry Safety Consortium

Autonomous vehicle chief Krafcik upbeat about Obama Admin’s new proposals.

by on Jan.14, 2016

This time the government is moving fast, said John Krafcik (l), head of Google's autonomous vehicle program, in Detroit.

The head of Google’s autonomous vehicle program said he wants to learn more about a precedent-setting auto industry consortium that will be announced in Detroit on Friday.

Organized by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the group will be aimed at bringing new safety technology to market faster than would be possible through the traditional regulatory process while also pushing those breakthroughs on to as broad a consumer market as possible.

Safety News!

“I’d guess I’d want to see more and understand more,” John Krafcik, the CEO of Google’s self-driving car program said in response to a question from TheDetroitBureau.com. He was at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit to attend another announcement by NHTSA and the U.S. Department of Transportation. (more…)