Detroit Bureau on Twitter

Posts Tagged ‘auto jobs’

VW’s Chattanooga Plant Expansion Bringing 9,800 Jobs

New study shows $370 million in annual income from new SUV.

by on May.28, 2015

VW's expansion of its Chattanooga, Tennessee plant, could result in 9,800 new jobs totaling $370 million in annual income.

The competition between states offering incentives and promises to secure new auto business is fierce and a new study shows why: money and jobs.

A study from the University of Tennessee’s Center of Business and Economic Research (CBER) indicates that the expansion of Volkswagen’s Chattanooga manufacturing plant to produce a new midsize SUV and the opening of a North American Engineering and Planning Center could create approximately 9,800 jobs and add $370 million in additional annual income, once the plant is fully operational.

Always Looking Ahead!

“The findings in the CBER study demonstrate that the incentive package recently passed by the Tennessee legislature will result in an economic growth multiplier of several times the state’s investment,” said David Geanacopoulos, executive vice president for Public Affairs and General Counsel, Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. (more…)

GM Investing $1.3 Billion at Five U.S. Plants

Move means 1,000 jobs, better quality and logistics.

by on Dec.16, 2013

General Motors announced nearly $1.3 billion in equipment upgrades at five U.S. plants.

The good news for U.S. manufacturing continued today with the announcement that General Motors plans to invest nearly $1.3 billion in five U.S. plants creating or saving 1,000 jobs.

The announcement comes just days after cross-town rival Ford Motor Co. announced it would add 5,000 jobs in the U.S. in 2014, part of a global expansion program. Detroit-based automakers, collectively, have added tens of thousands of jobs since emerging from the most recent recession and a period during which they slashed employment and closed scores of plant.

Speed Up Your Access to News!

“GM is committed to a strong American manufacturing base and creating jobs in dozens of communities throughout the country,” said GM Executive Vice President and North America President Mark Reuss in a statement. (more…)

Autoworkers Plan Auto Show Protests

More jobs, but harder work, critics complain.

by on Jan.11, 2013

The Detroit Auto Show has been targeted by a number of protests in recent years.

The auto industry has bolstered the U.S. economy but the increase in automotive production is also feeding some discontent inside the auto plants and some of the frustration will be on display outside Cobo Center in Detroit as the North American International Auto Show gets underway this weekend.

Supporters of the Auto Workers Caravan, which emerged in 2009 as an alternative voice for members of the United Auto Workers Union, are planning to demonstrate outside Cobo Center on Sunday afternoon to protest what they describe as “deteriorating working conditions.”

Keeping You Safe!

Working in auto plants requires less heavy lifting than it did a generation ago but the pace of work is faster and blue-collar workers in both union and non-union plants are asked to multi-task at what amounts to a daunting pace.


Ford Counts on Escape Launch to Help Solve Capacity Problems

Maker losing sales, share, officials warn.

by on Jun.14, 2012

A worker installs a front end module on a new Ford Escape at the Louisville Assembly Plant.

With the formal production launch of its new Escape crossover-utility vehicle, Ford Motor Co. caps off a $600 million investment in its Louisville assembly plant, converting a traditional truck facility with limited flexibility to one that can handle six different car-based models simultaneously.

The project was meant to address several problems facing the automaker.  Among other things, the massive factory will now be able to more rapidly adapt to shifts in market demand.  But equally important, it is part of a broader effort by Ford to catch up to the surging U.S. market.  Company officials have been warning that Ford is likely to lose sales and market share this year because it is running short of capacity after years of factory cutbacks.

Subscribe Now! It's Free!

“Louisville Assembly Plant’s reinvention illustrates how Ford is going further, continuing to invest in American manufacturing and new jobs,” proclaimed Ford President of the Americas Mark Fields, “while delivering even more of the fuel-efficient vehicles that give customers true power of choice.”


Auto Industry Driving the American Economy, Says GM CEO

GM goes after the best-and-brightest.

by on May.14, 2012

GM CEO Dan Akerson.

The auto industry has given the U.S. economy a major lift in recent months, GM chairman and chief executive officer Dan Akerson told new graduates of the Columbia University’s business school.

That’s a big shift from just a few years ago, when it was one of the forces of economic decline.  And Akerson’s speech clearly was aimed at convincing the best-and-brightest of the school’s students that they should be taking a closer look at Detroit as they begin their promising careers.

“The auto industry has gone from being an anchor on the economy to being the wind in its sails… in fact, we’re one of the few bright spots,” said Akerson, who joined GM after it emerged from its 2009 bankruptcy. “We’re adding jobs and investing in America, just as America invested in us.”

Since mid-2009, GM has announced investments of more than $7.1 billion in 30 U.S. facilities and created or retained nearly 18,000 American jobs, the executive noted

Your News Source!

“No one, not even the most enthusiastic supporters, predicted this three years ago: The auto industry is adding jobs and driving the economy again,” Akerson said.  “And that’s because two very different Administrations both had the wisdom to understand how important the auto industry is to our economy, and had the courage to act.


Toyota Hiring 100s of Engineers, Designers

Will focus on Detroit area, but also opening new Silicon Valley tech center.

by on Apr.05, 2012

Engineered in Detroit - the 2013 Toyota Avalon.

Toyota plans to hire about 250 engineers to help it continue a shift from global to localized product development. The bulk of those new employees will be based out of the maker’s new R&D center in suburban Detroit, but it will also open a new high-tech facility in Silicon Valley.

The move reflects the significant shift in Toyota’s whole management structure.  It has traditionally operated as a global monolith but is giving increasing autonomy to major regional operations, especially those in the U.S., the maker’s largest market.

Your Auto News Heavyweight!

The shift is underscored by the launch, this week, of the 2013 Toyota Avalon at the New York Auto Show.  The flagship sedan was developed entirely in the States, largely in the Motor City, with additional styling at CALTY, the advanced Toyota design center in Southern California.


Help Wanted: Automakers Can’t Fill All the Jobs

U.S. auto industry on a hiring binge and struggling to find necessary workers.

by on Apr.03, 2012

Automakers can't meet demand for all their open jobs.

The jobs were there, more than 1,000, according to the Engineering Society of Detroit, with everyone from the Detroit automakers to Korea’s Hyundai looking to hire.  What, or more precisely, who weren’t there were the job-seekers.

March was another good month for the U.S. auto industry, which is expected to report another month of double-digit, year-over-year sales gains today.  After years, of cutting back production – closing dozens of plants and eliminating an estimated 88,000 jobs during the Great Recession – that means automakers are racing to build back up production capacity.  They’re also looking to fill empty slots in design, engineering and other departments cut to the bone during the industry’s worst downturn in decades.

Subscribe Now - It's Free!

Detroit makers alone have created 10s of thousands of jobs since hitting bottom in 2009 with the bankruptcy of Chrysler and General Motors.  And their foreign-owned rivals are also putting out the “Help Wanted” signs.  Volkswagen is already planning a second round of hiring at its new assembly plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee.  BMW is expanding at its factory in South Carolina.  Hyundai’s Alabama assembly line needs more help to meet booming demand.


Domestics, Transplants Adding More Auto Jobs

Chrysler, VW, Honda responding to booming sales.

by on Feb.02, 2012

Chrysler will add another 1,000 U.S. workers to support production of the Dodge Dart.

The strong upturn in U.S. car sales will translate into a wave of new jobs for American auto workers.  Chrysler, Volkswagen and Honda all are announcing plans to expand production – meaning more workers – at plants across the country.

The biggest increase announced this week comes at Chrysler.  During a call to discuss the maker’s $183 million profit for 2011, CEO Sergio Marchionne revealed the maker will add another 1,000 workers at a plant in Belvidere, Illinois.  That will come in the form of a third shift to handle production of the new Dodge Dart sedan.

News You Can Use!

Chrysler has added thousands of jobs in the last 12 months and is preparing to ramp up production – and employment at several other facilities, including about 1,600 workers who will man a third shift at the Jeep plant near downtown Detroit and another Motor City facility that will begin production of the newly-updated Dodge Viper sports car later this year.

But the domestic makers – Ford and General Motors also on a hiring binge – aren’t alone, a new study suggesting 100,000 U.S. auto jobs will be added this year and next.


Chrysler Adding 1,100 Detroit Jobs to Build Jeep Grand Cherokee Diesel

Maker confirms plans to launch Dodge Viper, add 150 more jobs at reopened Connor plant.

by on Jan.06, 2012

Chrysler will add 1,100 jobs as it prepares to launch a diesel version of its popular Jeep Grand Cherokee.

Chrysler will add another 1,250 jobs at a pair of assembly plants in the Motor City, as it prepares to launch production of a diesel-powered version of the Jeep Grand Cherokee along with an all-new Dodge Viper sports car.

The biggest increase, involving 1,100 workers, will come with the addition of a third shift at the Jefferson North Assembly Plant, on Detroit’s east side.  Meanwhile, Chrysler will re-open its old Connor Avenue Assembly Plant, adding another 150 jobs.  The facility was closed prior to the maker’s 2009 bankruptcy when it stopped production of the old Dodge Viper.

Your Trusted Source!

“Our future, like the history of our brands, is interwoven with the City of Detroit,” said Chrysler Group Chairman and CEO Sergio Marchionne.  “We believe that investing in Detroit is not only the right thing to do, but it is a smart thing to do as we work to write the next chapter in our shared history.”


Ford Ranger Plant Ready to Close

Last compact pickup rolls off the line this week.

by on Dec.13, 2011

Production of the long-lived Ford Ranger is finally coming to an end.

The auto industry is back and providing one of the few sources of new jobs in an otherwise struggling U.S. economy.  Or so one might believe in most parts of the country.  Just don’t try to convince the workers at Ford’s Twin Cities Assembly Plant.

The maker hasn’t set a specific time yet but sometime around Friday it is expected that the last Ford Ranger will roll down the assembly line and the 86-year-old plant, located just outside Minneapolis, will finally shut down.

Though Ford has added thousands of jobs since the depths of the recession and promised to add thousands more as part of its new contract with the United Auto Workers Union about 800 union workers will be idled by the Twin Cities shutdown unless they can find a way to transfer to some other plant in the Ford network.

News You Can Use!

The creaky old factory has actually lasted far longer than most of its workers had anticipated.  A report in the Minneapolis Star Tribune notes that rumors of the factories demise were already circulating by 1949, shortly after the plant was converted back from war production.

“It looks like (they were) right, but it took Ford quite a while to finally get around to it,” the paper quoted 80-year old former autoworker Del Peterson.